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Sex, Drugs, and Defecation: What a Judge Has to Say About a Former NYC Investment Banker’s Scandalous Divorce

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One rich Manhattan couple’s nasty public divorce has drawn the ire of a judge — because their children can read the details on the internet.

Sage Kelly, a former investment banker with Jeffries, and his estranged wife, Christina Di Mauro, created quite the scandal when some of their divorce papers became public and revealed the secret life of a real life “Wolf of Wall Street.”

The 42-year-old Kelly has been accused by Di Mauro, 39, of abusing cocaine and alcohol — activities in which she was encouraged to take part.

Di Mauro also claims that Kelly coaxed her into participating in group sex with other couples and with Kelly’s clients, in order to win new accounts. In 2012, Kelly and Di Mauro switched partners with a client and his girlfriend in a Boston hotel room at Kelly’s prompting.

Of Kelly’s drug use, Di Mauro stated in a court affidavit that her husband would become so high on cocaine he would defecate in bed, on walls and on the floor in both their Fifth Ave. apartment and Sag Harbor home. Kelly denied Di Mauro’s accusations, saying in court papers, “I have never defecated or urinated in bed, on the floor or a wall.”

Kelly later resigned from his job after Di Mauro claimed that he also did drugs with other Jeffries employees. The allegations led to urine tests for top Jeffries executives, and Di Mauro later retracted her claim.

Supreme Court Justice Matthew Cooper told the couple in court on Thursday, Jan. 8, that their daughters, ages 6 and 10, “will forever be able to read allegations about their parents on the Internet as a result of papers provided to the public.”

“These innocent children have been caught up in this horrible, horrible fiasco,” Cooper said.

Di Mauro is currently seeking $7 million from Kelly — the sum of his former yearly salary before resigning from his job amid the scandal.

Di Mauro also wants joint custody of their two daughters. However, the couple may be one of the 29% who actually agree on their child custody situation without a third party, as they have come to an agreement on a pending divorce settlement.

According to Cooper, however, the “good news” for Kelly and Di Mauro is that New York City’s Administration for Children’s services “at this point is not taking action” against the couple for their behavior and questionable parenting.